DISASTER RECOVERY &
ASSET PROTECTION

  1. Are you backing up your information assets?
  2. What would happen if a disaster – a fire, flood or theft – destroyed your computer systems and files?
  3. Does the mere thought of this nag at you and keep you up all night?

Businesses of any size are at risk from a number of incidents that could prevent the company from continuing normal operations, anything from floods and accidents to power surges and intentional damage caused by disgruntled employees. And growing businesses, like yours, are at the highest risk of not having adequate prevention and recovery plans in place. It doesn’t need to be this way.

New tactics and solutions make it easier and more secure to keep your data, and your business, secure.

First, a comprehensive disaster recovery plan should include a descriptive list of your company’s major business areas. This list should rank the areas in order of importance to the overall company, and include a brief description of the business processes and main dependencies on systems.

In addition, your company should be sure to have a proactive strategy for disaster avoidance. An important part of your plan is to have a regular data backup schedule, monitor the actual backup process and run a regular test to ensure accurate recovery from the servers.

But more widespread types of failures (due to acts of terrorism, forces of nature such as tornadoes or earthquakes, or events such as multi-state power outages) require an even greater level of planning and management. The obvious solution to the problem of widespread disasters has been to locate one or more copies of the operational data at one or more sites located far enough apart so as not to be affected by any single disaster.

Tape-based backup solutions store a “snapshot” copy of data on inexpensive media that can be moved to a remote location and safely stored. If recovery is required, data can be restored from tape to disk at a recovery site and then used to restart critical applications.

Another approach is to use “asynchronous replication” to continuously maintain a relatively up-to-date copy of operational data on disk at a remote site. With this system, any changes to data at the local site are sent across a network and also applied at the remote site. Then, if recovery is required, servers and applications at the remote site can be brought up using this copy.

We understand the implications of disaster recovery, and we can help guide you to the most practical plan that can keep your business in business, even when the going gets rough.

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"IT For Growing Business"

Our Location
1201 Philco Road,
Baltimore, MD 21237

Phone: 410-918-0900
Toll-Free: 888-526-9344
Fax: 410-918-2550

Email:  info@eldsi.com

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